Really, Really Random Words

 

Well I am sitting here eating my lunch (a giant portion of glorified cabbage, which I adore) and finding out how to pronounce things. 

This all came about because in my Bible study this morning, Kay Arthur used the word diaspora, putting the emphasis on the second syllable.  Since I had always put the accent on the first and third, it had been bugging me all morning. 

So went to Wiktionary…no dice.  They don’t care about pronunciation, I guess.  I’m never going back there!  Dictionary.com however, was excellent–they actually have audio pronunciations for everything, I think.  Sure enough, Kay was right, and I now wonder how many times I have used that word…not many, surely.  Oh, well.

And that reminded me of diastasis, which I have always avoided saying since I have no clue and didn’t want to look dumb.  It is indeed di-AS-tuh-sis, as I suspected.  Oh, good, now I can talk about mine. 

Which led me to remember a few differences of pronunciation I’ve had with a good friend of mine who also likes words.  She calls the pretty orange-checked butterflies fri-TILL-aries, while I have always said FRIT-illary.  And when we talk about science curriculum, she uses Ap-o-LO-gia, while I say Apolo-GEE-uh.

I wasn’t really very sure about the fritillary, but Dictionary.com agreed with me.  Oh, yeah.  0  But when I went to the entry of Apologia, which I was quite sure I was right about, can you believe they said it her way????  I checked with several other of the big name dictionaries (in the process finding http://www.onelook.com/ which is a great way to compare several dictionaries easily) and would you believe they all concurred?  Since I’ve heard Jay Wile, the author of Apologia Science, speak at homeschool convention, I couldn’t believe it.  So I called the company.  Sure enough, she answered the phone  “Apolo-GEE-uh.”  So I was right.  But it seems that maybe they were wrong? 

Which leads to another one…  Some friends of ours opened a store which they call The Mercantile–last syllable rhyming with FILE.  My word-loving friend said it so that the last syllable rhymed with FEEL.  Well, sure enough, she’s right on that one, too.  Some of the dictionaries did have the long i sound as an option, but without fail the other was preferred.  But the owners call it TILE, so MercanTILE it is.  I guess that’s how language changes over time, isn’t it? 

Since I was curious, I decided to check fritillary, and it seems that her way is the British preference.  Aha!  So we’re both right. 

And if you’re still reading, you’re probably shaking your head and thinking, “This woman does not have enough to do!”  Well….trust me, I do.  I’m just not doing it.    And my lunch is long finished, so I suppose I should go try to be productive.

I have an old friend who once told mournfully that she never knew how to pronunciate things, so this post is for her, I guess! 

 

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About dayuntoday

I'm a wonderer. I spend a lot of time mulling, pondering, and cogitating. This is just a place to park some of those thoughts.
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10 Responses to Really, Really Random Words

  1. I didnt know what fritillary meant, so there! 

  2. sunshine1939 says:

    You just made my day!!!!!

  3. BooksForMe says:

    What is glorified cabbage?I loved this post!

  4. fwren says:

    I just LOVE this post!  LOL!  And who cares if you have things that didn’t get done for a bit!?? 

  5. homefire says:

    @BooksForMe – glorified cabbage– a marvelous way to eat vegetables, but probably not the healthiest way ever.    It’s shredded cabbage with onions and cheese and a mustard-y cream sauce, all baked together in a casserole with cracker crumbs on top.  Mmmmm.  @ProvokingThought – And now you do.  You’re welcome.  @sunshine1939 – @fwren – Glad you enjoyed it.  I figured everyone would think I was crazy. 

  6. I agree with your Apologia pronunciation, but perhaps we are both pronouncing a proper name, which could be different than the general purpose word.Here’s one you can research and let me know.  😉   Is it    uh-PLIC-able  or  A-pliccable ?

  7. homefire says:

    @PhilippiansThree14 – Everywhere I checked had both pronunciations, with APplicable listed first, but on the two where I listened to sound bites, they both said apPLICable.  Interesting.  My guess is that it used to be the first, but in recent years has shifted to the second.  At least I don’t think I really heard apPLICable until the past 10-15 years.  Sort of like the planet u-RA-nus, which has now become UR-uh-nus– so as to not sound like something rather embarrasing, perhaps?  And this is reminding me of another one that my son-in-law and I were discussing just the other day–preferable.  I often hear people say pre-FER-able, but it seems that PREFerable is preferable.

  8. @homefire – I always say the 2nd on preferable.  thanks for checking on applicable for me!  lol!  a friend and i were just discussing that a couple days ago, so i’m gonna pass this on.

  9. deyoderized says:

    Lol.  I loved this post and it made me feel as though you were a long lost cousin.  My late grandmother was famous for proving herself right with a dictionary.  My children think I do the same, and they’re delighted if they ever catch me mispronouncing a word!  (It happened once, I think) hehe But I love learning new words and knowing how to pronounce them.  Peripity and chiastic structure were my latest additions.  Well, not anymore…. I’d never heard of fritillery before. 🙂  Btw, I was with you on both apologia and diaspora!

  10. homefire says:

    @deyoderized – Maybe we are long-lost cousins!    You sure stumped me on those words.  PeripetyI may have heard of before, but I’d forgotten it.  It is a cool word–I’ll have to try to use that one.  Chiastic was one of those irritating ones that everyone defines with another obscure word:  relating to chiasmus.  Oh, yeah, well that really clears things up!    So do you write poetry?  Chiasmus seems quite poetic.

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